Saturday, 29 December 2018

Tips for a pet-safe New Year's Eve


While New Year's Eve celebrations are fun for us, our pets can easily be scared by the hullabaloo that comes with it. Here are some tips for a pet-safe New Year's eve;
  • Exercise pets during the day- take dogs on a long walk. For cats, play with them for half an hour or more. If they are tired, pets are more likely settle down and rest later in the evening. 
  • With fireworks going off through the evening, it is best to keep cats indoors (provide a litter tray). When taking your dog out for a toilet break, do so in your garden and keep them on a lead so that you can stay close to them. Ensure that their collar is fitted correctly so that there is no chance of escape should they become frightened.
  • Keep the curtains closed, lights on and turn up the radio or TV to help muffle out the sounds of the fireworks. 
  • Ignore any fearful behaviour such as panting, pacing and whining. Continue to stay relaxed and carry on as if nothing has happened. 
  • Behave normally and praise your dog if they are relaxed with cuddles and a treat.

Party animal!


  • When guests are arriving and leaving, keep your pet away from the front door to reduce the risk of them escaping or becoming overexcited and jumping up. 
  • Provide a safe, cosy 'pet- zone' for your pet to retreat to, with water, their bedding and a favourite toy. Shut the curtains and leave a light on. Play some soothing music at low level. Be sure to check on them frequently as the celebrations get into full swing, but remind guests to give them space and leave them in peace. 
  • If your pets do interact with party guests, make sure that everyone knows not to feed your pet food or alcohol and be mindful of where leaving your plate and glass. This may seem self-explanatory, but some people may not be aware of the dangers of such behaviour.
  • Take care not to leave objects lying around that your pet could chew and swallow such as wine corks, cracker toys, corn on cob.
  • Party poppers and crackers can cause a fright - ensure that pets are in their safe area and away from the noise before they are pulled. 


Cats will tend to hide if scared. Do not try to coax them out if they are hiding. Before your party guests arrive make sure that your cat has some safe hideaway areas where they won't be bothered. Ensure that they can access their litter tray and food should they wish.



We wish you all a safe

 & happy New Year!











Disclaimer:
     The contents of the Arden House Animal Hospital website are for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinary advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your Veterinary Surgeon with any questions you may have regarding your animal’s medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. 




Tuesday, 18 December 2018

Christmas and New Year opening times

Emergencies              ☎ 01895 633600

In order to provide 24 hour care throughout the festive period, we are working with Vets Now to ensure your pets have the best possible care. We will continue to provide our own emergency service up until 4 pm on Christmas Eve (Mon 24th December) returning at 8.00 am on Thursday 27th December. Our own emergency service will be available from 8:00 am on 27th December until 4 pm on New Year's Eve ( Mon 31st January).

Vets Now will provide all emergency care from 4 pm on Christmas Eve until 8:00 am on Thursday 27th December and from 4 pm on New Year's Eve (Monday 31st December) until 8.00 am on Wednesday 2nd January. 

If you need to access any emergency care throughout the festive period please telephone the usual clinic number on 01895 633 600 and listen carefully to the instructions on the answerphone message.

Vets Now are a dedicated emergency care provider based in Harrow; 

Here are our opening hours
 (consultation by appointment) 



Ruislip:
  • Saturday 22nd December: 9:00 am - 2:00 pm
  • Sunday 23rd December: Emergency service
  • Monday 24th December: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
  • Christmas Day ( 25th December): Emergency service 
  • Boxing Day ( 26th December) : Emergency service
  • Thursday 27th December: 9:00 am - 7:30 pm 
  • Friday 28th December: 9:00 am - 7:30 pm
  • Saturday 29th December: 9:00 am - 2:00 pm
  • Sunday 30th December: Emergency service
  • Monday 31st December: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
  • New Year's day ( 1st January) : Emergency service
  • Wednesday 2nd January: 9:00 am - 7:30 pm
  • Thursday 3rd January: 9:00 am - 7:30 pm 
  • Friday 4th January: 9:00 am - 7:30 pm 




Greenford: 
  • Saturday 22nd December: 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
  • Sunday 23rd December: Emergency service 
  • Monday 24th December: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
  • Christmas Day ( 25th December): Emergency service
  • Boxing Day ( 26th December ): Emergency service
  • Thursday 27th December: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm 
  • Friday 28th December: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm
  • Saturday 29th December: 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
  • Sunday 30th December: Emergency service
  • Monday 31st December: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
  • New Year's Day ( 1st January) : Emergency service
  • Wednesday 2nd January: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm
  • Thursday 3rd January: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
  • Friday 4th January: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm

Harefield:
  • Saturday 22nd December: 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
  • Sunday 23rd December: Emergency service
  • Monday 24th December: 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
  • Christmas Day ( 25th December): Emergency service 
  • Boxing Day ( 26th December ) : Emergency service 
  • Thursday 27th December: 9:00 am - 12:00 noon & 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  • Friday 28th December: 9:00 am - 12:00 noon & 2:00 pm - 6:00 pm 
  • Saturday 29th December: 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
  • Sunday 30th December : Emergency service
  • Monday 31st December: 9:00 am - 12:00 noon & 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  • New Year's Day ( 1st January ) : Emergency service
  • Wednesday 2nd January: 9:00 am - 12:00 noon & 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  • Thursday 3rd January: 9:00 am - 12:00 noon & 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm 
  • Friday 4th January: 9:00 am - 12:00 noon & 2:00 pm - 6:00 pm 


Wishing you all a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!






Further Information on Vets Now


Vets Now are the leading provider of out of hours veterinary care in the UK. Vets Now works alongside your daytime practices to ensure pet owners have access to a vet whenever they need one regardless of the time. Their clinics are open when your daytime practice is closed.


  • Please always call your usual surgery telephone number and if they are closed please listen carefully to the instructions on the answerphone message about how to contact the duty veterinary surgeon.

Who works in the Vets Now clinics?

Fully qualified vets, nurses and receptionists are based in the clinic for the full duration of their shift.
All staff receive regular training with a particular emphasis on emergency and critical care of small animals.
How do you get in touch with Vets Now if you need to use the service?
You can call the usual clinic number (01895 633 600) and listen to an answer machine message giving the number of your local Vets Now clinic. Call the clinic with details of the problem and qualified staff will give you advice on what do.
All telephone calls are logged and recorded for reference purposes.

Can you just phone for advice and how much will that cost?

We have subscribed on your behalf to the Vets Now Out of Hours service. Their trained staff can offer advice over the phone and although an appointment is always offered it is not always necessary. In fact only around 20% of calls result in an appointment. Telephone advice is provided free of charge as part of the complete service.

If your pet needs to be treated, how do you pay?

Vets Now is an independent company so you will be asked to pay at the time of treatment. Vets Now accept all major debit and credit cards or cash payments. Details of Vets Now fees are available from the practice.

Are Vets Now fees covered by pet insurance?

Vets Now fees should be covered in the same way as any other veterinary fees by your insurance company. If you are in any doubt, check the detail of your policy with your provider.




Monday, 10 December 2018

Pet safety at Christmas.


Our poem is a reminder to have a pet-safe Christmas!

Twas the night before Christmas.....and at Arden House, Albert was dreaming of a new catnip mouse; when in walked the vet with some patients to see, first a kitten had fallen out of a Christmas tree. Mimi had tried to climb to the top, the tree toppled over and down she dropped! Felix had swallowed red tinsel strands, he was now being sick; an operation was planned.


With everything well and the animals fed, and Albert still asleep in his nice comfy bed; loudly the phone started to ring...’It’s my dog’ said the owner, ‘she’s raided the bin!’ Penny the Labrador’s groans could be heard; She’d eaten the bones from the cooked Christmas bird. ‘I’ll need to see her’ the vet explained as Penny was in a lot of pain.


At the hospital Penny was admitted to stay, to receive care throughout Christmas Day. The sound of the phone rang out again. ‘I’m worried about my dog!’ an owner exclaimed.
 ‘What’s happened?’ asked the vet concerned; she’d eaten a bar of dark chocolate he learned.
‘Please bring her straight in for emergency care’ the vet advised as fully aware, that a compound in chocolate in pets is toxic and likely to be what’s making her sick.


Image result for dog christmas chocolate poisoning

Lola the pug was next to arrive
 having eaten a pack of luxury mince pies. 
Raisins and grapes are unsafe for pets,
so if eaten, it's important to contact your vet.


Image result for off the leash raisins

With the patients all treated and settled, 
the vet went to put on the kettle.
 When up on the roof, the sound of hooves -
the arrival of somebody special!
'I have a gift for Albert the cat'
 greeted Santa wiping his boots on the mat. 
' And one of my reindeer has injured his foot,
 would you be so kind to take a look?'



The vet heard of Dasher's plight,
 he'd slipped on ice when he landed from flight.
An x-ray showed no broken bones, the reindeer was fit to fly to more homes.
 With tablets prescribed to help Dasher's pain,
 it was time for Santa to take the reins.
'Merry Christmas to you, Ho Ho Ho' beamed Santa as he prepared to go.
With Rudolph's nose providing the light,
 off whizzed his sleigh into the night!

...............................................



Other hazards;



🎄Bottle corks, corn on the cob, cocktail sticks, cracker toys, ribbon and tinsel can be dangerous if swallowed. Ensure that they are tidied away or kept out of reach of pets. 


    🎄Ingestion of batteries is more common at this time of year. If the battery is chewed and pierced it can cause chemical burns and heavy metal poisoning. If they are swallowed whole it is possible they will cause an obstruction. All batteries are potentially toxic so if you suspect your dog or cat has chewed or swallowed a battery - please call us.



IN AN EMERGENCY

If you think that your pet may have eaten something that they shouldn't have then swift action is necessary.

Follow these four simple steps:

Step 1Prevent your pet from eating any more.
Step 2 - Phone your vet immediately!
Step 3 - Stay calm and follow your vet's instructions.
Step 4 - Collect the relevant wrapping and packaging.


     Make a note of our phone number and call us immediately -

01895 633600



Further advice 
   
   Christmas time often means a busy home, with friends and family coming together in seasonal spirit. Remember that new faces and more noise can be scary for your pet, so it’s a good idea to provide them with a safe room so they can escape and be put at ease if it all becomes too much. Be mindful of the front door opening with guests arriving and leaving. Make sure that dogs can't run out!  It’s also important to maintain your pet’s normal routines, especially with feeding and exercise, to avoid them becoming too unsettled.


      
      DISCLAIMER: 

      
    The contents of the Arden House Animal Hospital website are for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinary advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your Veterinary Surgeon with any questions you may have regarding your animal’s medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.